Two Wolves & Intentionality

Aside

An old Cherokee chief was teaching his grandson about life…

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy.
“It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves.

“One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, self-doubt, and ego.

“The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith.

“This same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather,
“Which wolf will win?”

The old chief simply replied,
“The one you feed.”

*From Pearls of Wisdom; inspired by Mark Franklin’s Career Cycles framework.

Advertisements

All A-Twitter

Aside

Exciting news, everyone!

Psychopoeia is now officially on Twitter!

Follow @Psychopoeia for post updates, site-related news, psychology banter, and more.

I’ll be managing the account for now, but it’s possible other authors may make an appearance in the future. You’ll also find our tweets in the widget on the sidebar.

Happy tweeting!

How to Land Your Kid in Therapy

Aside

Stumbled across a great article on how “over-parenting” has lead to a generation of therapy-goers.  If you have the time (it’s a 4-pager), it’s a well-written and thought provoking piece – I very much recommend it.

Here’s an excerpt:

Here I was, seeing the flesh-and-blood results of the kind of parenting that my peers and I were trying to practice with our own kids, precisely so that they wouldn’t end up on a therapist’s couch one day. We were running ourselves ragged in a herculean effort to do right by our kids—yet what seemed like grown-up versions of them were sitting in our offices, saying they felt empty, confused, and anxious. Back in graduate school, the clinical focus had always been on how the lack of parental attunement affects the child. It never occurred to any of us to ask, what if the parents are too attuned? What happens to those kids?

via How to Land Your Kid in Therapy – Magazine – The Atlantic.

What is a Therapist?

Aside

Over the years as I have continued my studies in psychotherapy, I have often been amazed at how varied and diverse the profession is. I started off with a general idea of what it meant to be a therapist and since then have found not only that my idea has grown in scope and complexity but that there are many different paths that people have taken towards the same goal. There are many different roads towards becoming a therapist and each bring their own perspectives and ideas on the profession. Often one is no more effective than the other even though they may differ greatly.

Since I have begun working as a therapist, this awareness has been reinforced by the diversity of perspectives and expectations that clients have of therapists and the therapeutic process. Depending on their background, their past experience with the mental health and their goals for coming to therapy, their concept of who I am, or what my role is as a therapist can look pretty different.

Rather than just talking about the different perspectives that people have of therapists, I thought it would be interesting to use this blog as an opportunity to hear from different people’s perspectives and highlight some of the similarities and differences that exist.

In the comments section below, write the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the question “What is a Therapist?”.

It could be a word, or an image, or a feeling or a more elaborate description depending on what feels right to you. In this there’s no right or wrong answers, only different perspectives.

Ask Your Riding’s Candidates About Psychological Services

Aside

We’ve got an election coming up here in Canada, and the fine folks at the Canadian Psychological Association have put together a website on advocating for psychology during the campaigning.  Check it out!

They have a section on the site that lists questions you could ask the candidates in your riding about psychological services.  I’ve borrowed and listed them below:

  1. Does your party platform contain anything related to the psychological health of Canadians?
  2. Do you support parity between resources made available for treatment of psychological and physical health problems?
  3. Do you support the specific inclusion of initiatives related to psychological health and addictions for 2014 when the federal-provincial health accord comes up for renewal?
  4. What will your party do to improve access to psychological services in Canada and in this riding, particularly for middle and low income Canadians?  Less than one-third of persons with mental health problems receive needed services. Psychologists are the country’s largest, regulated group of health professionals who specialize in mental health. With cuts to the budgets to publicly funded service in hospitals and schools, psychologists increasingly work in private practice. Though psychologists in private practice are successfully self-employed, their services are not accessible to many Canadians who need them. They are not accessible because too many Canadians do not have the financial means or extended health insurance to pay for them.
  5. There are significant recruitment and retention issues in government and other sectors when it comes to psychologists (e.g. Department of National Defense, Veterans Affairs, Correctional Services Canada). What will your party do to ensure an adequate supply of Canada’s mental health human resource meets the needs of Canadian who fall under the Federal Governments constitutional authority?
  6. What will your party do to support individuals, families, the workplace and communities when it comes to psychological health and disorders?

Not sure who the candidates in your riding are?  Find out at the Elections Canada website.

Post a Week 2011

Aside

If you’re a regular reader you’ve probably noticed the badge on the sidebar (visible on the main page) that says “Post a Week 2011.”  It’s an initiative (as is “post a day 2011,” which I’m just not man enough to commit to) that WordPress.com came up with this year to motivate bloggers to write more regularly.

What does this mean?  Well, it’s basically a guarantee that there will be at least one post here every week for at least the rest of 2011.  Which shouldn’t be a shocker, as I’ve been posting every week since Sept 2010, but it’s nice to have a more official flavour to it.

Enjoy your internet wanderings!  For more about Post a Week 2011, click on the badge on the sidebar.

Bathtub Therapy

Aside

My first contribution to this blog last year talked briefly about some of the reactions that I received from family and friends when they heard I was going into the family therapy profession. My grandpa, a wonderful man with an ever-present sense of humor responded by sharing with me a psychology themed joke which had been sent to him by a friend. I keep it at my desk and it always brings a smile to my face so i thought I’d share it here for your enjoyment:

During a visit to a mental asylum, a visitor asked the Director what the criterion was that defined whether or not a patient should be institutionalized.

The Director Replied, “We fill up a bathtub and offer a teaspoon, a teacup and a bucket to the patient and then ask them to empty the bathtub”

“Oh, I understand,” said the visitor. “A normal person would use the bucket because it’s bigger than the spoon or the teacup”

“No,” said the Director, “A normal person would pull the plug. Do you want to be by the wall or near the window?”